Oil rebounds from 18-yr lows after U.S., Russia agree to talks
  • Brent futures up 1.9%, WTI up 5.8%
  • Texas regulator official requests for crude oil production cuts
  • Saudi Arabia plans to boost exports to 10.6 mln bbls from May

SEOUL, March 31 (Reuters) - Oil recovered ground on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin agreed to talks to stabilise energy markets, with benchmarks climbing off 18-year lows hit as the coronavirus outbreak cut fuel demand worldwide. Brent crude LCOc1 was up by 43 cents, or 1.9%, at $23.19 a barrel by 0406 GMT, after closing on Monday at $22.76, its lowest finish since November 2002. U.S. crude Clc1 was up by $1.16, or 5.8%, at $21.26 a barrel, after settling in the earlier session at $20.09, lowest since February 2002. Oil markets have faced a double whammy from the coronavirus outbreak and a price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia after OPEC and other producers failed to agree on deeper cuts to support oil prices in early March.Trump and Putin agreed during a phone call to have their top energy officials discuss stabilising oil markets, the Kremlin said on Monday.

Asia shares inch up, China's factories show flicker of life
  • Asian stock markets : Link
  • Asia shares supported by month-end demand, calmer mood
  • China factory survey beats forecasts, PMI rises to 52.0
  • Oil prices steady for now after steep drop

SYDNEY, March 31 (Reuters) - Asian shares were closing out a calamitous quarter with a tentative rally on Tuesday as factory data from China held out the hope of a rebound in activity, even as much of the rest of the world shut down. China's official manufacturing purchasing managers' index (PMI) bounced to 52.0 in March, up from a record-low 35.7 in February and topping forecasts of 45.0. Analysts cautioned the index could overstate the true improvement as it measures the net balance of firms reporting an expansion or contraction in activity. If a company merely resumed working after a forced stoppage, it would read as an expansion without saying much about the overall level of activity.

Gold falls as dollar strengthens
  • Low oil prices could slow cenbank bullion purchases-analyst
  • Russia's central bank to stop buying gold starting April 1
  • Platinum set for worst quarter since Sept. 2008
  • Silver set to post its worst quarter since June 2013

March 31 (Reuters) - Gold prices fell on Tuesday as the dollar firmed and as shares rose on hopes of a rebound in China economic activity, while safe-haven demand amid concerns over the coronavirus outbreak kept the metal on track for its sixth straight quarterly gain. Spot gold XAU= fell 0.5% to $1,613.40 per ounce by 0327 GMT. It gained about 6.4% for the quarter, and about 1.8% for the month. U.S. gold futures GCcv1 eased 0.2% to $1,615.80. "The dollar, yields, and a better equity market performance are pressuring gold," said Stephen Innes, chief market strategist at financial services firm AxiCorp, adding that the negative correlation between equities and gold has started to form again. The dollar .DXY gained against its key rivals as investors braced for prolonged uncertainty and governments tightened lockdowns and launched monetary and fiscal measures to fight the virus.

Latest FAQ's

What is Cryptocurrency

What is Cryptocurrency
What is Cryptocurrency

What Is a Cryptocurrency?
A cryptocurrency is a digital or virtual currency that is secured by cryptography, which makes it nearly impossible to counterfeit or double-spend. Many cryptocurrencies are decentralized networks based on blockchain technology—a distributed ledger enforced by a disparate network of computers. A defining feature of cryptocurrencies is that they are generally not issued by any central authority, rendering them theoretically immune to government interference or manipulation.

What is Investment

What is Investment
What is Investment

What Is an Investment?
An investment is an asset or item acquired with the goal of generating income or appreciation. In an economic sense, an investment is the purchase of goods that are not consumed today but are used in the future to create wealth. In finance, an investment is a monetary asset purchased with the idea that the asset will provide income in the future or will later be sold at a higher price for a profit. An investment always concerns the outlay of some asset today (time, money, effort, etc.) in hopes of a greater payoff in the future than what was originally put in.

What is Stock

What is Stock
What is Stock

What Is a Stock?
A stock (also known as "shares" or "equity") is a type of security that signifies proportionate ownership in the issuing corporation. This entitles the stockholder to that proportion of the corporation's assets and earnings. Stocks are bought and sold predominantly on stock exchanges, though there can be private sales as well, and are the foundation of many individual investors' portfolios. These transactions have to conform to government regulations which are meant to protect investors from fraudulent practices. Historically, they have outperformed most other investments over the long run. These investments can be purchased from most online stock brokers. Stock investment differs greatly from real estate investment.

What is Forex

Forex Trading: A Beginner's Guide
Forex Trading: A Beginner's Guide

Forex is a portmanteau of foreign currency and exchange. Foreign exchange is the process of changing one currency into another currency for a variety of reasons, usually for commerce, trading, or tourism. According to a recent triennial report from the Bank for International Settlements (a global bank for national central banks), the average was more than $5.1 trillion in daily forex trading volume.1

What is Commodity

What is Commodity
What is Commodity

What Is a Commodity?
A commodity is a basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other goods of the same type. Commodities are most often used as inputs in the production of other goods or services. The quality of a given commodity may differ slightly, but it is essentially uniform across producers. When they are traded on an exchange, commodities must also meet specified minimum standards, also known as a basis grade. They tend to change rapidly from year to year.

Online Media Login